2019-2020 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 13, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Information



Academic Vision

Fontbonne University promotes informed and discerning practice in scholarship, the arts, the professions, and service. By combining a pursuit of academic excellence with an evolving awareness of the world’s needs, the Fontbonne community seeks to strengthen the relationship between the educated person and a diverse society. In concert with an emphasis on teaching and learning, the university promotes vital engagement between intellectual endeavor and social responsibility, giving meaning to information and insight to inquiry. In an open, caring, and challenging environment, students and teachers integrate knowledge from the liberal arts and professional programs, developing the understanding and skills central to a thoughtful and committed life.

Teacher Certification: Undergraduate Programs

Full information on teacher certification for both the undergraduate and the graduate programs may be found in the section titled Teacher Certification at Fontbonne University, following the graduate section in this catalog. Also, see each academic department for available certifications in specific undergraduate majors.

Undergraduate Online & Blended Courses

Fontbonne University offers fully online, accredited, undergraduate degree programs in multiple disciplines Fontbonne University’s online courses are student-centered, just as the traditional face-to-face courses are. The learning environment is an asynchronous one, giving flexibility to the online course. The asynchronous nature of the course does not mean that the course lacks structure and/or deadlines.

Students are expected to participate in class discussions and activities and have weekly assignments and deadlines. Course requirements may include weekly group discussions, online quizzes, individual and/or small group assignments, readings, problem solving, or the critiquing of articles. Online undergraduate courses may require proctored testing on campus or at an approved location.

Fontbonne also offers several degree programs in a blended format. This requires some on-campus meetings. The number of face-to-face meetings varies depending on the program.

Prior to taking the first online course at Fontbonne University, a student must complete the Blackboard Tutorial, a free tutorial, which introduces the student to Blackboard, the online course environment, to our sponsors, the Sisters of St. Joseph, and to Fontbonne University history. Students who register for online courses, or courses for which the Blackboard Tutorial is a prerequisite, will automatically be enrolled in the tutorial. The Blackboard Tutorial is available beginning several weeks before the start of every semester and before each eight-week term. Access information will be sent to all students enrolled in the tutorial; this information will be sent to the students’ Fontbonne University email address.

Students should prepare themselves to begin all online courses on the first day of the semester or the first day of the scheduled course duration. For new online students, this preparation includes completing the Blackboard Tutorial in advance of the semester start date. Students must complete the Blackboard Tutorial at least one business day (Monday thru Friday) before the start of courses to be prepared to begin their course on time. Students who do not participate in their online course on the first day will be reported to the Registrar’s Office for non-attendance and may be dropped from their course.

Please contact Jo Ann Mattson for more information about blended or online degree programs at Fontbonne or if you have any questions regarding the Blackboard tutorial: jmattson@fontbonne.edu or 314-889-4514

If you experience issues with Blackboard in any of your courses, or to ask a question about Fontbonne University email or other technology issues please contact AskIT at: askIT@fontbonne.edu or 314.719.8095.

Minimum Technology Requirements for Online Students

  • Minimum of 2 GB of RAM with DSL or high-speed Internet access.
  • Windows and Office 2013 or higher for PC and Office 2008 for Mac. Most online courses require Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, and many require Excel. Fontbonne University’s standard software platform is MS Office 2013. FONTBONNE STUDENTS GET FREE ACCESS TO MICROSOFT OFFICE 365! http://my.fontbonne.edu/msoffice (Scroll down to locate information.)
  • Some courses require the purchase of additional course-specific software; this information should be listed in the course schedule or course syllabus.
  • Use of Fontbonne University email is mandatory for online courses.
  • Students must have daily access to a computer; it is recommended that students have their own computer for use with online coursework.

Use of Fontbonne University email is mandatory for online courses. Students must have daily access to a computer. It is recommended that students have their own computer for use with online coursework.

Students planning to reside outside the United States while engaging in an online Fontbonne University course must obtain prior written approval from the Vice President for Academic Affairs before enrollment.

Students residing in states other than Missouri, please visit our website to locate State Authorization information.

In order to maintain proper state authorization for distance education, it is vital that you inform Fontbonne prior to moving to a different state. Even if the move is temporary, Fontbonne University is required to submit the state in which the students are residing at the time of taking the online course. We are not currently authorized to enroll students in our distance education programs in all 50 states. Please contact Jo Ann Mattson JMattson@Fontbonne.edu or 314.889.4514 when relocating to another state.

Online Students - Filing Complaints with Your State or Accrediting Agency

Students not residing in the state of Missouri during the time of attending online courses should also follow Fontbonne’s internal administrative procedures. However, if the issue or complaint is not resolved at the institutional level, a student may file a complaint within the state he or she is living in at the time of enrollment. Visit our website to obtain student grievance contact information for individual states.

Academic Advising

Academic advising at Fontbonne University is an integral part of the larger mission of the University. It serves to assist students to identify and achieve their educational goals, while creating collaborative relationships with other institutional departments, faculty and staff. The advising process is an on-going and developing one, whereby both the advisor and advisee share responsibilities. In the event that an advisor/advisee arrangement does not work effectively, a student may petition the director of academic advising for a new advisor.

The advisor’s role is rooted firmly in education, providing the necessary information regarding policies, degree programs, courses, schedules and registration. Advisors must reach out developmentally as well by engaging students in self-directed learning, creating academic plans and strategies, discussing personal goals and referring individuals to the appropriate campus resources. Students may not register for courses until being cleared by their advisor.

With the support and guidance of their academic advisor, advisees are expected to learn and practice the habits of successful students. This includes maintaining regular contact with all of their academic stakeholders, taking responsibility for consulting the University Catalog, making final decisions about choices regarding their academic careers, preparing in advance for relevant meetings, gathering all pertinent information, following through on referrals, asking questions and striving to be an ethical and contributing member of society through critical thought and action.

Additional information may be obtained through the advising website.

General Education Requirements

Culture & the Common Good: A Liberal Arts Education at Fontbonne University

General Education provides Fontbonne graduates with a true liberal arts education, designed to prepare students to become ethical and informed global citizens who are able to contemplate complex ideas and generate creative solutions. It focuses on developing skills, knowedlge and values to this end. General Education requirements include Mission Core, Foundations, Pillars, Bridges and Writing Intensive courses. View the most up-to-date course lists for meeting these requirements at: http://my.fontbonne.edu/academic-resources/curriculum-guides/?role=faculty. Copies are also available in the Registrar’s Office or The Office of Academic Advising.

Through general education at Fontbonne, students will develop the following:

  • Intellectual and practical proficiences critical for application across the curriculum, in interdisciplinary inquiry, and in the wider world
  • Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, engagement with questions both contemporary and enduring
  • Ethical and responsible attentiveness to the pursuit of justice and the common good in pluralistic contexts

Mission Core

The purpose of the Mission Core is to bring a distinctively Fontbonne perspective to the general education program. The values and heritage of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, the founders and sponsors of Fontbonne University, and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition and Catholic Social Teaching as they apply to the liberal arts and professional programs are key elements of Mission Core courses.

Foundations of Knowledge

Foundations requirements - communication, mathematics, and managing information – build critical skills that support all academic disciplines.

Pillars of Knowledge

Pillars requirements expand upon the Foundations to more fully prepare students for the challenges of the 21st century through coursework in the humanities, fine arts, philosophy, the social and behavioral sciences, and physical and biological sciences.

Bridges of Knowledge

Bridges courses ensure that students have an opportunity for interdisciplinary study across campus or off-campus, integrating academic knowledge with community and/or global experiences.

Requirements

These requirements apply to all undergraduate degree programs and consist of a minimum of 42 credit hours of academic course work taken within the following components:

Mission Core: 6 Credits.

These courses integrate Fontbonne’s Mission, Vision and Values and a global perspective into the curriculum.

Mission Core I: 3 credits.

The goal of Mission Core I: Culture & the Common Good is to prioritize attention to issues of historical remembrance, social justice, and diversity, to build alliances with individuals and organizations that are bringing about positive changes in the global community, and to integrate the liberal arts with professional education. Completion of this requirement partially fulfills the state Valuing requirement. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Identify links between one’s personal and professional goals; Fontbonne’s educational mission, as supported by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet; and the common good, a principle of Catholic Social Teaching.
  2. Articulate the challenges of reconciling seemingly divergent ideas about the common good within a pluralistic society.
  3. Develop awareness of campus resources to foster personal and professional development.

Mission Core I

One course is required of all students with fewer than 30 credit hours of college credit.

INT 105 - Mission Core I: Culture and the Common Good  Credit(s): 3

Mission Core II: 3 credits, 200-level or above.

Courses designated as MC II will be housed within academic departments and their content will reflect the academic disciplines. The course will weave together the academic discipline with themes of global citizenship, disciplinary knowledge, and Catholic Social Teaching. Through the following learning outcomes, students will demonstrate critical thinking skills within the context of the course. Completion of this course meets the state requirement on Higher Order Thinking. A Mission Core II course cannot be used to fulfill the Foundations, Pillars, or Bridges requirements. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the challenges of global citizenship relevant to a particular academic field.
  2. Apply the concepts of Catholic Social Teaching to the challenges of global citizenship in this academic field of study.
  3. Articulate an informed response to the relevance of Catholic Social Teaching to the challenges of global citizenship in this academic field of study.

One course is required (3 credits). See link at beginning of section for courses that meet this requirement.

Foundations of Knowledge: 17 credits.

These courses form the foundation of a solid liberal arts education.

Written Communication: 6 Credits.

Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of writing as a social, rhetorical action, including the elements of rhetorical situations (audience, purpose, genre, exigence) and their broader social and historical contexts.
  2. Implement the writing process from generating ideas through developing a final written piece.
  3. Adapt their writing according to the expectations and conventions (including but not limited to styel, usage, grammar, punctuation, syntax, language, content, and citation) of differnet genres and intended audiences, including those appropriate to their discipline(s) of study.
  4. Ethically and effectively use sources to situate writing within a scholarly or professional conversation with clear statements of argument or purpose supported by well-organized and developed reasons and evidence.

Two courses are required

ENG 101 - Composition I  Credit(s): 3

ENG 102 - Composition II  Credit(s): 3

Oral Communication: 3 Credits.

Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate research skills, including the appropriate handling and evaluation of sources.
  2. Present information using language, style, materials, adn content appropriate ot the audicence and occasion.
  3. Develop and present an oral presentation to effectively support a specific purpose.

One course is required (3 credits). See link at beginning of section for courses that meet this requirement.

Mathematics: 3 Credits Minimum.

Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the use of mathematical applications in a variety of contexts and disciplines.
  2. Apply mathematical skills and concepts to solve quantitative problems.
  3. Apply mathematical models to real life situations.
  4. Communicate mathematics effectively in written and/or oral modes.

One course is required (3 credits). See link at beginning of section for courses that meet this requirement.

Managing Information: 4 Credits Minimum.

Upon completion of LIB 199 Information Literacy in Higher Education , students will be able to:

  1. Articulate or discuss the ethical and legal use of information.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to access information to address an issue.
  3. Discriminate among types of information for their intended purpose.
  4. Synthesize information form a variety of sources.

Information Literacy in Higher Education (1 credit) is required.

Upon completion of a specified CIS course, students will be able to:

  1. Articulate the legal, ethical, or security issues surrounding the use of electronic information technology.
  2. Identify appropriate applications of electronic information technology to a specific situation.
  3. Manage data efficiently using contemporary electronic information technology.
  4. Communicate effectively by using contemporary electronic information technology.

One course is required (3 credits). See link at beginning of section for courses that meet this requirement.

State and National Government: 1-3 Credits.

Completion of this requirement partially meets the state requirements on Social and Behavioral Sciences. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. With reference to state and federal constitutions, compare and contrast the rights and responsibilities granted to citizens of Missouri with the rights and responsibilities granted to citizens of the US.

One course is required (3 credits).

Pillars of Knowledge: 18 credits.

Pillars courses build on Fontbonne’s Foundations courses. Students select one course from six of the seven categories listed (minimum 3 credit hours each), to include at least one laboratory science course. See link at beginning of section for courses that meet these requirements.

Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Identify how disciplinary knowledge is created in the social and behavioral sciences.
  2. Explain how discipline-related theories are used to describe human behavior.
  3. Apply core principles of the discipline to the social or behavioral issues.

Literature.

Completion of this requirement meets the state requirements on Humanities and Fine Arts. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Express an understanding of how literary language creates meaning.
  2. Understand literary genres.

Philosophy.

Completion of this requirement meets the state requirement on Valuing. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Identify diverse perspectives, values, and belief systems.
  2. Explain how values and belief systems influence and are influenced by historical and/or social and/or cultural contexts.
  3. Analyze a contemporary social issue through the lens of values and belief systems.
  4. Propose a solution to a contemporary social issue using ethical principles.
  5. Recognize and defend one’s own personal values and belief system.

History.

Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the relevance of historical phenomena.
  2. Explain how primary sources are used in historical interpretation. 

Fine Arts.

Completion of this requirement meets the state requirement on Humanities and Fine Arts. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Identify artistic techniques across historical and/or cultural and/or multicultural contexts.
  2. Express an understanding of the role of creative imagination.
  3. Apply critical methodologies to evaluate a work of visual or performing art.
  4. Articulate an understanding of how the visual or performing arts influence viewers or audiences across historical and/or cultural and/or multicultural environments.

Life Science.

Completion of this requirement meets the state requirement on Life and Physical Sciences. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate scientific literacy, critical thinking skills, and scientific skepticism.
  2. Learn, develop, and/or practice skills necessary for a lab or field experience in the life sciences.

Physical Science.

Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Articulate their understanding of the basic terminology in at least one area of physical science.
  2. Solve problems that draw conclusions using mathematical methods or models as well as relevant technology.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency with equipment and scientific instruments learned through hands-on experiences in a physical science lab.

BRIDGES of Knowledge

Across the Campus, Across the Globe: 3 credits.

Bridges courses encourage students to connect the General Education courses they have taken to a global perspective. Students select one course from any option listed below. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  1. Articulate the relationships between scholarship and the broader context in which it exists.

LINK (Learning through and Interdisciplinary Nexus of Knowledge)

The goal of a LINK course is to promote opportunities for interdisciplinary discussions among faculty and between faculty and students. The context may encompass any topic but should challenge the academic community to better understand the world and thereby prepare our students for participation as global citizens.

Although the student could choose to take separate courses for each Pillars requirement specified, they could elect to take one or several LINK course(s) which combine content and perspective from more than one discipline and count towards the requirement for each Pillar category involved. Taking one LINK course could give a student an elective for any general education course so long as that elective course is outside the student’s major. More than one LINK course may be taken.

Insight Project

A student may complete an Insight project at any point after completing at least 64 credit hours (including 9 credit hours in the major). The Insight project will allow students to bring disciplinary expertise to working on a specific interdisciplinary concern, demonstrating their ability to collaborate across disciplines and applying their skills and talents to serving a world in need.

Culture Connections

This option includes interdisciplinary courses from programs not represented in Foundations or Pillars that directly address culture as a vehicle for the transmission of meaning and values.

Culture and Common Good (CCG)

A CCG course prepares students for the challenges of citizenship in the 21st century and exposes them to programs not otherwise represented in the Foundations or Pillars categories. [The course used to fulfill this requirement must not be listed under “Courses required in the Major” as described for each particular major in the current Fontbonne University catalog. For example: A student seeking a major in elementary education could fulfill this requirement with PSY 200 but not with an EDU-prefix course listed under “Courses required in the Major”.]

These courses should incorporate at least three of the following areas of emphasis:

Globalization - with attention to economic, political, cultural, historical, corporate, ethical, and/or religious dimensions of the process of global integration as well as the implications of each.

Diversity - with attention to concerns such as inequality, identity, inclusion, oppression, (im)migration, social justice as they relate to people of specific races, ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, ages, disability statuses, or national origins.

Sustainability - with attention to concerns such as climate change, biodiversity, development, resource usage, ecology, consumption, food production, population, and ethics and technology related to these concerns.

Civic Engagement - with attention to varieties and histories of democratic societies, including the United States, as well as the requirements for and challenges of democracy in this nation and elsewhere.

Advocacy and Social Justice - with attention to understanding public policy and social institutions through which change historically has been and still may be achieved and/or hindered.

The Media - with attention to the ways in which the media construct, promote, distort, or improve the frames through which we understand the challenges of citizenship in the 21st century.

Dedicated Semester. A Dedicated Semester course offered in majors, as special topics, in a specific area, or as a general education course fulfills the Bridges requirements.

Foreign Language. Any foreign language course which by its inherent nature includes bridging diverse cultures satisfies the Bridges requirement. Foreign language credit from an accredited, post-secondary institution will meet this requirement.

Service Learning. Service-learning is a form of experiential learning and is a “purposeful teaching pedagogy that engages students in reciprocal experiences that respond to community-defined needs, incorporates structured reflection for students to learn about themselves and the complexity of social issues and sustainable change, and develops a greater understanding of their civic responsibilities to help better society through collaborations and partnerships” (Fontbonne University Service-Learning Task Force Report, 2010).

Study Abroad. Study abroad is a form of experiential learning that includes elements of globalization, diversity and civil engagement. Academic courses must be taught by Fontbonne University faculty or by instructors holding advanced degrees from accredited U.S. or overseas universities.

Writing Intensive

Students must take two writing intensive courses: one at the 200-level or above and one at the 300-level or above, which may be embedded in major, minor, or other requirements. Upon completion of this requirement, students will be able to:

  • Implement the writing process from generating ideas through developing a final written piece.
  • Write in language and formats appropriate to the discipline.

Independent Study Courses

Independent study course, available to qualified undergraduate degree-seeking students, allow students to pursue interests not available in the established curriculum. An independent study course may take the form of research, a reading program, or a special off-campus project. Each independent study course must have an instructor.

A completed application for an independent study must be submitted to the registrar’s office on the registration in undergraduate special course form at the time of registration. The form is available from the registrar’s office.

Students who have completed 60 or more credit hours and are not on academic probation may register for an independent study course.

See respective academic departments for independent study course numbers and descriptions.

Cooperative Education

The cooperative education program permits students to gain valuable work experience in their major field of study while earning money to help finance their education. Students with sophomore, junior, or senior status may apply for positions in business or non-profit organizations. Students earn one to six hours of academic credit for each semester of cooperative work experience. The credit, considered elective credit, contributes to the 120 hours required for graduation. Students may earn up to 18 hours of cooperative education credit. Students in all majors except education, special education, deaf education, and speech-language pathology may take advantage of this opportunity

Academic Tours

National and international tours and trips for academic credit are sponsored by Fontbonne University under the guidance of faculty and professional staff. For students, such tours and trips involve prior reading, attendance at planning meetings, and full participation in all tour or trip and follow-up activities as outlined in the syllabus prepared by the instructor. The course prefix includes the letter code of the sponsoring college/department and usually has either a 200- or 400-level number assigned to it. Academic tours and trips ordinarily carry no more than three hours of credit.

Study Abroad

Fontbonne encourages students to become a part of the global community by offering multicultural learning experiences through individual study abroad programs, faculty-directed study abroad trips (see academic tours above), and international community-service projects. Students have participated in programs and projects throughout the world, including Africa, Australia, Belize, Costa Rica, England, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and Taiwan.

Short-term, semester, and academic year study abroad opportunities are available. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in order to participate in study abroad programs. For additional information on study abroad see the Fontbonne website.

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Fontbonne University offers students the opportunity to earn undergraduate credit for non-collegiate sponsored learning. Prior learning assessment is a concept based on accepted principles of adult learning and serves to validate the professional competence achieved by men and women outside the classroom. Credit for prior learning may be earned as a result of professional training and college/university-level learning gained through experience, military training, and/or validated by various tests. Prior learning credit will be awarded only if the work assessed meets or exceeds “C” level coursework.

A maximum of 32 credit hours will be accepted in PLA credit opportunities at Fontbonne. Students may not count PLA credit toward the 30-hour residency requirement at Fontbonne or toward a program’s core requirements, and may not receive credit more than once for the same learning/competency achievement. Fees charged for PLA credit are subject to change.

The standards and criteria established by Fontbonne for assessing college/university-level learning were developed in conformance with guidelines set forth by the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL). Fontbonne University cannot guarantee how another college or university might interpret transfer credit awarded through Prior Learning Assessment.

Standardized Tests

Students may earn credit through the assessment of their college/university-level learning by the following methods of testing. Students cannot earn credit for an examination if they have taken a college/university course of equal or higher equivalency in that area prior to the exam. The testing methods recognized by Fontbonne are defined as follows:

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Students may earn credit for CLEP general and subject examinations to fulfill certain course requirements according to the respective college or department policy. Official test scores must be received by the registrar’s office directly from the testing agency. Credit is awarded if the score received is at or above the American Council of Education (ACE) recommended score.

International Baccalaureate (IB)

Students who earn an acceptable score on the IB exam as approved by the appropriate college dean or department chairperson may be awarded university credit.

Advanced Placement (AP)

Students who score three, four or five on Advanced Placement tests may be awarded university credit through Fontbonne, subject to the approval of the appropriate college dean or department chairperson. Each college/department in which the course is housed, in consultation with the Office of Academic Affairs, will determine the test score and the number of credits accepted for the equivalent course (s) offered in their department. A student who scores one or two on AP tests will not receive advanced placement or earn university credit. Official test scores must be received by the registrar’s office directly from the testing agency.

A list of the Fontbonne courses that are satisfied by advanced placement courses is available in the offices of the coordinator of prior learning assessment, admission, registrar, and academic affairs.

Advanced Subsidiary (AS-Level) and Advanced Level (A-Level) Credit

Students who have successfully completed Advanced Subsidiary or Advanced Level (A-Level) may be awarded credit based on their exam results as determined by the college dean or department chairperson.

Non-Standardized Exams/Credit from Accredited Institutions and Organizations and Military Experience

College/university credit can be awarded for military courses and enlisted ranks/military occupational specialties (MOS) which adhere to the standards of and have been evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide. When available, submission of the ACE registry transcript is required. If ACE is unable to provide a transcript, the DD214 and/or a transcript of in-service training is required.

Professional Training

College/university credit may be awarded for professional training courses sponsored by business and industry, government, and labor which adhere to the standards of and have been evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE) or the New York State Program on Non-collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI).

Credit by Exam

Fontbonne will accept undergraduate credit by exam for non-standardized examinations given by accredited institutions. The course number, title, and credit hours must appear on the official transcript. Determination as to the fulfillment of certain course requirements will be reviewed and considered by the appropriate department chair in consultation with the college dean.

Department Proficiency Exams

Several departments offer proficiency exams for specific Fontbonne courses. Students who satisfactorily complete the proficiency exam for a specific course may petition to have the requirement met and to receive credit for the particular course.

Portfolio Evaluation

The portfolio evaluation is available in two formats:

  1. Portfolio I: Documented Learning and
  2. Portfolio II: Narrative Essay. If students believe they have already acquired the competencies of specific university courses, they may petition for credit through the portfolio evaluation. Students can earn credit for courses listed in the Fontbonne University catalog as well as for college/university-level courses listed in the catalogs of an accredited degree-granting college or university, provided there is a Fontbonne faculty member who can evaluate the request relative to learning outcomes. The prior learning assessment coordinator provides guidance in portfolio preparation and submission procedures. The portfolio must contain detailed evidence of learning outcomes, supporting documentation, and descriptions of personal and professional experience.

Portfolio I: Documented Learning

Students must prepare a portfolio of their learning experiences, which can be documented by licenses, certifications, or transcripts from non-accredited or professionally accredited colleges and schools.

Professional training programs through local corporations, which have not been evaluated by ACE/PONSI, may be included in this portfolio.

The documented learning portfolio should have content congruent to the established Fontbonne University specific course for which credit is being petitioned. Credit awarded for the documented learning portfolio must not be greater than the credit assigned to the specific course as listed in the Fontbonne catalog.

Portfolio II: Narrative Essay

If the student has extensive knowledge which cannot be supported through areas of learning covered under the Portfolio I description, Portfolio II must be prepared for assessment. The narrative essay portfolio relies on the student’s explanation of the learning outcomes and the practical application of the experiences. Examples of supporting documentation include work samples, certificates of completion of workshops/seminars, and verification from superiors.

For additional information on prior learning assessment, please contact the office of Academic Affairs at 314.889.1401.

Inter-Institutional Cross Registration

Fontbonne University participates in an inter-institutional agreement with the following universities: Lindenwood, Maryville, Missouri Baptist, and Webster. Undergraduate students may take courses at these host institutions only during the fall and spring semesters under the following conditions:

  • The student must take 12 or more credits (including the inter-institutional course) and pay full tuition at Fontbonne.
  • The inter-institutional course is not offered at the home institution during the semester the student wishes to take the course.
  • The host institution must have room in the course.
  • The student is limited to six credits or two courses per semester at the host institution.
  • The student does not pay additional tuition for the inter-institutional course (unless it brings the total credits over 18), but must pay the host institution any incidental fees such as for laboratory or studio materials.
  • The student should not take inter-institutional courses during the semester in which the student expects to graduate due to the unavailability of a timely final transcript from the other institution’s registrar’s office.

The Fontbonne registrar’s office handles registration for inter-institutional courses. Required forms are available in the registrar’s office.

Chiropractic. Dual Degree in Chiropractic with Logan University College of Chiropractic in St. Louis (3/3)

Fontbonne University students may elect to pursue a 3/3 program of study in connection with the Logan University College of Chiropractic in St. Louis. Students who have completed the first three years of coursework toward a biology degree at Fontbonne, and have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 can apply to Logan University College of Chiropractic. Upon satisfactory completion of the first year of coursework in chiropractic, the student will be awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Fontbonne University. It is the student’s responsibility to apply for the bachelor’s degree from Fontbonne during the fall semester of the student’s first year at Logan University. Upon satisfactory completion of the third year of study at Logan College of Chiropractic the student would be awarded a doctorate in chiropractic.

Engineering. Dual Degree Program with the University of Missouri-Kansas City or with Washington University in St. Louis

Fontbonne University students may choose a dual degree program of study in collaboration with either the School of Computing and Engineering at the University of Missouri-Kansas City or the James McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. This program may be combined with any major, but is most easily achieved in conjunction with a major in applied mathematics or in biology. Because of the many engineering avenues, students must work closely with the dual degree advisor to map out a curriculum plan. A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of B+ (3.25 on a 4.0 scale) or better, both overall and in science and mathematics courses, is required for admission to the engineering schools. Applicants with lower GPAs are considered on a case-by-case basis. Upon satisfactory completion of both programs, the student will be awarded bachelor of science degrees from both Fontbonne University and the University of Missouri-Kansas City or from both Fontbonne University and Washington University in St. Louis.

Nursing with the Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis (2/2)

Fontbonne University students may elect to pursue a program of study in connection with the Goldfarb School of Nursing (GSON), located at the Barnes-Jewish Hospital complex. Students who have completed a minimum of one semester with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 may apply for admission to GSON. If accepted, the student must complete the remainder of the general education and prerequisite coursework, maintaining a 3.0 cumulative grade point average, before transferring to GSON for training in clinical techniques and procedures. Qualified students should be aware that there can be a waiting period before matriculation at GSON. After completion of 5 terms at GSON the student would qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (BSN) from the Goldfarb School of Nursing. Each school retains its own tuition rates and separate financial aid packages, and GSON students must be available a minimum of 30-40 hours per week, for course work and simulation labs during the day or evenings and for clinical experiences during days, evenings and/or weekends. Students complete their clinical experiences at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Missouri Baptist Medical Center and other BJC HealthCare hospitals and St. Louis area health care facilities.

For certification as an RN, eligible graduates must also pass the National Council Licensure Exam (NCLEX).

Occupational Therapy with Washington University in St. Louis (3/2)

Fontbonne University students may elect to pursue a 3/2 program of study in connection with the Occupational Therapy (OT) program in the Washington University School of Medicine. Students who have completed the first three years of coursework for either a biology or a psychology degree at Fontbonne and who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in required prerequisite courses may apply for admission to the OT program at Washington University during their junior year at Fontbonne. Upon satisfactory completion of the first year of coursework at Washington University, the student will be awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in biology or a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Fontbonne University. It is the student’s responsibility to apply for the bachelor’s degree from Fontbonne during the fall semester of the student’s first year at Washington University. At the end of the second year of study at Washington University, the student would qualify for a master of occupational therapy degree from the Washington University School of Medicine.

Social Work. Accelerated Bridge Program with Saint Louis University School of Social Work

Admission pre-requisites for Fontbonne University’s undergraduate Social Work students for Saint Louis University’s School of Social Work MSW Program are

  • A major in Social Work
  • Completion of Social Work Foundation Courses
  • Obtained senior level status
  • An undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 including transfer credit; and a 3.2 GPA in major
  • Registered as a Fulltime Student

*The minimum credit hours for fulltime status at Fontbonne is 12 credit hours. However, Students should not exceed 12 credit hours when registered in the Masters level courses at Saint Louis University.

Timeline

By October 1st Attend Mandatory Information Session led by SLU Graduate Admissions

By November 15 Eligible students notified via email by Fontbonne BSW Program Director

By February 1st Applications due through the online system, including:

  • Application to Accelerated Program
  • Resume
  • Professional Goal Statement
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Transcript

By February 15 Participate in an in-person interview with Director of SLU Graduate Admissions

By March 1 receive admission decision via email from SLU’S Office of Graduate Education

By March 15 Confirm admissions through the online system described in the admissions email from SLU’s Office of Graduate Education

By April 15 Meet with Fontbonne BSW Advisor and SLU MSW Program Director to plan senior year.

Students with conditional probationary admissions into the Bridge Program may take between 3 - 9 credit hours.

Students will be granted credit for these courses in the MSW Program contingent upon:

  • Maintaining a “B” or better in all MSW courses and maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0.
  • Completion of all baccalaureate degree requirements at Fontbonne University
  • Meet all requirements for admission into the MSW Program at SLU

Failure to meet any of these requirements may jeopardize the student’s admission into the MSW Program.

Accelerated Bridge students will be given conditional probationary admissions in to the MSW Program. Saint Louis University School of Social Work tuition rates and fees will apply towards MSW courses taken. Accelerated Bridge students are not eligible to apply for School of Social Work scholarships until they have completed their undergraduate degree and become a classified student in the MSW Program. Students should discuss with their undergraduate financial aid office and Saint Louis University’s Office of Student Financial Services what, if any, federal/state grants or loans will apply to their study at Saint Louis University School of Social Work.

Upon completion of graduation requirements at Fontbonne University, receipt of final transcript and successful completion of MSW courses; student admissions status will be reviewed and updated to classified.

Social Work. Accelerated Degree Arrangement with Washington University in St. Louis

Fontbonne students may choose a 3/2 program of study in connection with the George Warren Brown (GWB) School of Social Work at Washington University. Students who have completed the first three years of required work for a major in human services at Fontbonne and who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.5 may apply for admission to the GWB School of Social Work at the end of the junior year. Upon satisfactory completion of the first year at GWB, the student will be awarded a bachelor of arts degree from Fontbonne University. It is the student’s responsibility to apply for this degree from Fontbonne at the satisfactory completion of the first year at GWB. At the end of the second year of study at GWB, students should qualify for a master of social work (MSW) degree at Washington University.

Theology. Aquinas Institute of Theology Accelerated Undergraduate/ Graduate Agreement

This agreement gives Fontbonne’s Religious Studies major accelerated access to graduate education. Ecumenical in scope, this program appeals to students who wish to pursue graduate studies in theology, careers in theological education, and a variety of lay ministries.

Association of Colleges of Sisters of St. Joseph (ACSSJ) Exchange Program

The Association of Colleges of Sisters of St. Joseph (ACSSJ) Exchange Program offers students the opportunity to broaden their educational experience by studying for a semester or a year at a member campus. On each of the ACSSJ campuses the student “will encounter a caring and hospitable community, concern for all without distinction, efforts to respond to the needs of the times, an orientation toward excellence, and endeavors to make a difference in the local and world community.” The program offers an enriched academic experience with many exciting opportunities for intellectual and personal development.

To be eligible for the exchange program, a student must have completed, by the time of the visit to another campus, at least 24 semester hours at the home campus and have achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 system. A student interested in the exchange program should contact the office of academic affairs for more information at least one full semester before the planned exchange. Contact the office of academic affairs for more information. Members include:

International Affiliations

Fontbonne University has affiliations with a number of institutions around the world for undergraduate and graduate programs. These universities include:

Xi’an Fanyi University - China
Wuchang University of Technology - China
China Women’s University - China
Xi’an Siyuan University - China
Fu Jen Catholic University - Taiwan
National Taiwan University of Arts - Taiwan
Chang Jung Christian University - Taiwan
Aletheia University - Taiwan
Hosei University - Japan
Regent’s College London - United Kingdom
Siva Sivani Institute of Management - India
Beifeng University of Nationalities - China
Providence University - Taiwan
Blue Hill College - Ecuador
Broward College - Ecuador
INTI - Malaysia
Singapore Polytechnic - Singapore
Siva Sivani Institute of Management - India
Hunan University of Science & Engineering - China

Please direct all questions related to international affiliations to the Office of International Affairs at 314-889-4778 or internationalaffairs@fontbonne.edu.